ᐅ143+ Socrates Quotes On Life, Wisdom & Philosophy

“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.” ― Socrates

“The unexamined life is not worth living.” ― Socrates

“I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only make them think” ― Socrates

“There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance.” ― Socrates

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle.” ― Socrates

“Strong minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, weak minds discuss people.” ― Socrates

“Wonder is the beginning of wisdom.” ― Socrates

“To find yourself, think for yourself.” ― Socrates

“Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.” ― Socrates

“By all means marry; if you get a good wife, you’ll become happy; if you get a bad one, you’ll become a philosopher.” ― Socrates

“He who is not contented with what he has, would not be contented with what he would like to have.” ― Socrates

“Be slow to fall into friendship, but when you are in, continue firm and constant.” ― Socrates

“If you don't get what you want, you suffer; if you get what you don't want, you suffer; even when you get exactly what you want, you still suffer because you can't hold on to it forever. Your mind is your predicament. It wants to be free of change. Free of pain, free of the obligations of life and death. But change is law and no amount of pretending will alter that reality.” ― Socrates

“The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” ― Socrates

“Sometimes you put walls up not to keep people out, but to see who cares enough to break them down.” ― Socrates

“No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable.” ― Socrates

“The secret of happiness, you see, is not found in seeking more, but in developing the capacity to enjoy less.” ― Socrates

“Know thyself.” ― Socrates

“Let him who would move the world first move himself.” ― Socrates

“Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty.” ― Socrates

“Death may be the greatest of all human blessings.” ― Socrates

“Employ your time in improving yourself by other men's writings so that you shall come easily by what others have labored hard for.” ― Socrates

“The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our separate ways, I to die, and you to live. Which of these two is better only God knows.” ― Socrates

“The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance.” ― Socrates

“Do not do to others what angers you if done to you by others.” ― Socrates

“I am not an Athenian or a Greek, but a citizen of the world." [As quoted in Plutarch's Of Banishment]” ― Socrates

“Every action has its pleasures and its price.” ― Socrates

“I examined the poets, and I look on them as people whose talent overawes both themselves and others, people who present themselves as wise men and are taken as such, when they are nothing of the sort. From poets, I moved to artists. No one was more ignorant about the arts than I; no one was more convinced that artists possessed really beautiful secrets. However, I noticed that their condition was no better than that of the poets and that both of them have the same misconceptions. Because the most skillful among them excel in their specialty, they look upon themselves as the wisest of men. In my eyes, this presumption completely tarnished their knowledge. As a result, putting myself in the place of the oracle and asking myself what I would prefer to be — what I was or what they were, to know what they have learned or to know that I know nothing — I replied to myself and to the god: I wish to remain who I am. We do not know — neither the sophists, nor the orators, nor the artists, nor I— what the True, the Good, and the Beautiful are. But there is this difference between us: although these people know nothing, they all believe they know something; whereas, I, if I know nothing, at least have no doubts about it. As a result, all this superiority in wisdom which the oracle has attributed to me reduces itself to the single point that I am strongly convinced that I am ignorant of what I do not know.” ― Socrates

“Prefer knowledge to wealth, for the one is transitory, the other perpetual.” ― Socrates

“We cannot live better than in seeking to become better.” ― Socrates

“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.” ― Socrates

“Beware the barrenness of a busy life.” ― Socrates

“understanding a question is half an answer” ― Socrates

“Life contains but two tragedies. One is not to get your heart’s desire; the other is to get it.” ― Socrates

“The hottest love has the coldest end.” ― Socrates

“Envy is the ulcer of the soul.” ― Socrates

“Be as you wish to seem.” ― Socrates

“Thou shouldst eat to live; not live to eat.” ― Socrates

“I know that I am intelligent, because I know that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us.” ― Socrates

“The greatest way to live with honour in this world is to be what we pretend to be.” ― Socrates

“To fear death, gentlemen, is no other than to think oneself wise when one is not, to think one knows what one does not know. No one knows whether death may not be the greatest of all blessings for a man, yet men fear it as if they knew that it is the greatest of evils.” ― Socrates

“Be nicer than necessary to everyone you meet. Everyone is fighting some kind of battle.” ― Socrates

“From the deepest desires often come the deadliest hate.” ― Socrates

“Once made equal to man, woman becomes his superior.” ― Socrates

“My friend...care for your psyche...know thyself, for once we know ourselves, we may learn how to care for ourselves" -Socrates” ― Socrates

“If you want to be a good saddler, saddle the worst horse; for if you can tame one, you can tame all.” ― Socrates

“The beginning of wisdom is the definition of terms.” ― Socrates

“I pray Thee, O God, that I may be beautiful within. ” ― Socrates

“One should never do wrong in return, nor mistreat any man, no matter how one has been mistreated by him.” ― Socrates

“If a man comes to the door of poetry untouched by the madness of the Muses, believing that technique alone will make him a good poet, he and his sane compositions never reach perfection, but are utterly eclipsed by the performances of the inspired madman.” ― Socrates

“Regard your good name as the richest jewel you can possibly be possessed of -- for credit is like fire; when once you have kindled it you may easily preserve it, but if you once extinguish it, you will find it an arduous task to rekindle it again. The way to a good reputation is to endeavor to be what you desire to appear.” ― Socrates

“The really important thing is not to live, but to live well. And to live well meant, along with more enjoyable things in life, to live according to your principles.” ― Socrates

“The easiest and noblest way is not to be crushing others, but to be improving yourselves. ” ― Socrates

“He is richest who is content with the least, for content is the wealth of nature.” ― Socrates

“Those who are hardest to love need it the most.” ― Socrates

“In all of us, even in good men, there is a lawless wild-beast nature, which peers out in sleep.” ― Socrates

“If all our misfortunes were laid in one common heap whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be content to take their own and depart.” ― Socrates

“I only know that I know nothing” ― Socrates

“The greatest blessing granted to mankind come by way of madness, which is a divine gift.” ― Socrates

“Is it true; is it kind, or is it necessary?” ― Socrates

“All I know is that I do not know anything” ― Socrates

“Children nowadays are tyrants. They contradict their parents, gobble their food, and tyrannise their teachers.” ― Socrates

“Be of good cheer about death, and know this of a truth, that no evil can happen to a good man, either in life or after death.” ― Socrates

“Think not those faithful who praise all thy words and actions; but those who kindly reprove thy faults.” ― Socrates

“My advice to you is get married: if you find a good wife you'll be happy; if not, you'll become a philosopher.” ― Socrates

“Esteemed friend, citizen of Athens, the greatest city in the world, so outstanding in both intelligence and power, aren't you ashamed to care so much to make all the money you can, and to advance your reputation and prestige--while for truth and wisdom and the improvement of your soul you have no care or worry?” ― Socrates

“All men's souls are immortal, but the souls of the righteous are immortal and divine.” ― Socrates

“The highest realms of thought are impossible to reach without first attaining an understanding of compassion.” ― Socrates

“To be is to do” ― Socrates

“The mind is everything; what you think you become” ― Socrates

“I did not care for the things that most people care about– making money, having a comfortable home, high military or civil rank, and all the other activities, political appointments, secret societies, party organizations, which go on in our city . . . I set myself to do you– each one of you, individually and in private– what I hold to be the greatest possible service. I tried to persuade each one of you to concern himself less with what he has than with what he is, so as to render himself as excellent and as rational as possible.” ― Socrates

“To move the world we must move ourselves.” ― Socrates

“To know thyself is the beginning of wisdom.” ― Socrates

“I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled [poets] to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who deliver all their sublime messages without knowing in the least what they mean.” ― Socrates

“I know you won't believe me, but the highest form of Human Excellence is to question oneself and others.” ― Socrates

“Virtue does not come from wealth, but. . . wealth, and every other good thing which men have. . . comes from virtue.” ― Socrates

“He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god.” ― Socrates

“There is no solution; seek it lovingly ” ― Socrates

“The misuse of language induces evil in the soul” ― Socrates

“Through your rags I see your vanity.” ― Socrates

“Wisdom begins in wonder.” ― Socrates

“Not life, but good life, is to be chiefly valued. ” ― Socrates

“The only thing I know is that I know nothing, and i am no quite sure that i know that.” ― Socrates

“It is better to change an opinion than to persist in a wrong one.” ― Socrates

“When you want wisdom and insight as badly as you want to breathe, it is then you shall have it.” ― Socrates

“Intelligent individuals learn from every thing and every one; average people, from their experiences. The stupid already have all the answers.” ― Socrates

“God takes away the minds of poets, and uses them as his ministers, as he also uses diviners and holy prophets, in order that we who hear them may know them to be speaking not of themselves who utter these priceless words in a state of unconsciousness, but that God himself is the speaker, and that through them he is conversing with us. ” ― Socrates

“Living well and beautifully and justly are all one thing.” ― Socrates

“And therefore if the head and the body are to be well, you must begin by curing the soul; that is the first and essential thing. And the care of the soul, my dear youth, has to be effected by the use of certain charms, and these charms are fair words; and by them temperance is implanted in the soul, and where temperance comes and stays, there health is speedily imparted, not only to the head, but to the whole body.” ― Socrates

“One who is injured ought not to return the injury, for on no account can it be right to do an injustice; and it is not right to return an injury, or to do evil to any man, however much we have suffered from him.” ― Socrates

“Are you not ashamed of caring so much for the making of money and for fame and prestige, when you neither think nor care about wisdom and truth and the improvement of your soul?” ― Socrates

“Give me beauty in the inward soul; may the outward and the inward man be at one.” ― Socrates

“My plainness of speech makes them hate me, and what is their hatred but a proof that I am speaking the truth.” ― Socrates

“There is no greater evil one can suffer than to hate reasonable discourse.” ― Socrates

“Well, although I do not suppose that either of us know anything really beautiful & good, I am better off than he is- for he knows nothing & thinks that he knows; I neither know nor think that I know.” ― Socrates

“To express oneself badly is not only faulty as far as the language goes, but does some harm to the soul.” ― Socrates

“One day, the old wise Socrates walks down the streets, when all of the sudden a man runs up to him "Socrates I have to tell you something about your friend who..." "Hold up" Socrates interrupts him "About the story you're about to tell me, did you put it trough the three sieves?" "Three sieves?" The man asks "What three sieves?" "Let's try it" Socrates says. "The first sieve is the one of truth, did you examine what you were about to tell me if it is true?" Socrates asks. "Well no, I just overheard it" The man says. "Ah, well then you have used the second sieve, the sieve of good?" Socrates asks "Is it something good what you're about to tell me?" "Ehm no, on the contrary" the man answers. "Hmmm" The wise man says "Let's use the third sieve then, is it necessary to tell me what you're so exited about?" "No not necessary" the man says. "Well" Socrates says with a smile "If the story you're about to tell me isn't true, good or necessary, just forget it and don't bother me with it.” ― Socrates

“He is not only idle who does nothing, but he is idle who might be better employed.” ― Socrates

“Beauty is a short-lived tyranny” ― Socrates

“…money and honour have no attraction for them; good men do not wish to be openly demanding payment for governing and so to get the name of hirelings, nor by secretly helping themselves out of the public revenues to get the name of thieves. And not being ambitious they do not care about honour. Wherefore necessity must be laid upon them, and they must be induced to serve from the fear of punishment. And this, as I imagine, is the reason why the forwardness to take office, instead of waiting to be compelled, has been deemed dishonourable. Now the worst part of the punishment is that he who refuses to rule is liable to be ruled by one who is worse than himself. And the fear of this, as I conceive, induces the good to take office, not because they would, but because they cannot help — not under the idea that they are going to have any benefit or enjoyment themselves, but as a necessity, and because they are not able to commit the task of ruling to any one who is better than themselves, or indeed as good. For there is reason to think that if a city were composed entirely of good men, then to avoid office would be as much an object of contention as to obtain office is at present…” ― Socrates

“For the poet is a light and winged and holy thing, and there is no invention in him until he has been inspired and is out of his senses, and the mind is no longer in him: when he has not attained to this state, he is powerless and is unable to utter his oracles.” ― Socrates

“Do not trouble about those who practice philosophy, whether they are good or bad; but examine the thing itself well and carefully. And if philosophy appears a bad thing to you, turn every man from it, not only your sons; but if it appears to you such as I think it to be, take courage, pursue it, and practice it, as the saying is, 'both you and your house.” ― Socrates

“The ancient Oracle said that I was the wisest of all the Greeks. It is because I alone, of all the Greeks, know that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“It is a disgrace to grow old through sheer carelessness before seeing what manner of man you may become by developing your bodily strength and beauty to their highest limit.” ― Socrates

“One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing'.” ― Socrates

“Be true to thine own self” ― Socrates

“Are you not ashamed of heaping up the greatest amount of money and honour and reputation, and caring so little about wisdom and truth and the greatest improvement of the soul? ” ― Socrates

“The more I know, the more I realize I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“May the inward and outward man be as one.” ― Socrates

“Wealth does not bring about excellence, but excellence makes wealth and everything else good for men, both individually and collectively.” ― Socrates

“Be as you wish to seem” ― Socrates

“I honor and love you: but why do you who are citizens of the great and mighty nation care so much about laying up the greatest amount of money and honor And reputation, and so little amount wisdom and truth and the greatest improvement of the soul? Re you not ashamed of these?... I do nothing but go about persuading you all, not to take thought for your persons and your properties, but first and chiefly to care about the greatest improvement of the soul. I tell you that virtue is not given by more, but that from virtue comes money and every other good of man. ” ― Socrates

“True knowledge exists in knowing that you know nothing.” ― Socrates

“As to marriage or celibacy, let a man take which course he will, he will be sure to repent.” ― Socrates

“A system of morality which is based on relative emotional values is a mere illusion, a thoroughly vulgar conception which has nothing sound in it and nothing true.” ― Socrates

“Now the hour to part has come. I go to die, you go to live. Which of us goes to the better lot is known to no one, except the god.” ― Socrates

“Such as thy words are such will thine affections be esteemed and such as thine affections will be thy deeds and such as thy deeds will be thy life ...” ― Socrates

“All I know is that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“The unexamined life is not worth living” ― Socrates

“An unconsidered life is not one worth living.” ― Socrates

“Remember that there is nothing stable in human affairs; therefore avoid undue elation in prosperity, or undue depression in adversity.” ― Socrates

“Smart people learn from everything and everyone, average people from their experiences, stupid people already have all the answers.” ― Socrates

“And so they grow richer and richer, and the more they think of making a fortune the less they think of virtue; for when riches and virtue are placed together in the scales of the balance, the one always rises as the other falls.” ― Socrates

“The true champion of justice, if he intends to survive even for a short time, must necessarily confine himself to private life and leave politics alone.” ― Socrates

“I desire only to know the truth, and to live as well as I can... And, to the utmost of my power, I exhort all other men to do the same... I exhort you also to take part in the great combat, which is the combat of life, and greater than every other earthly conflict.” ― Socrates

“As for me, all I know is that I know nothing, for when I don't know what justice is, I'll hardly know whether it is a kind of virtue or not, or whether a person who has it is happy or unhappy.” ― Socrates

“I soon realized that poets do not compose their poems with knowledge, but by some inborn talent and by inspiration, like seers and prophets who also say many fine things without any understanding of what they say.” ― Socrates

“I do believe that there are gods, and in a far higher sense than that in which any of my accusers believe in them.” ― Socrates

“No one knows whether death may not be the greatest of all blessings for a man, yet men fear it as if they knew it was the greatest of evils.” ― Socrates

“Remember, no human condition is ever permanent. Then you will not be overjoyed in good fortune, nor too sorrowful in misfortune.” ― Socrates

“Mankind is made of two kinds of people: wise people who know they're fools, and fools who think they are wise.” ― Socrates

“Neither in war nor yet at law ought any man to use every way of escaping death. For often in battle there is no doubt that if a man will throw away his arms, and fall on his knees before his pursuers, he may escape death; and in other dangers there are other ways of escaping death, if a man is willing to say and do anything. The difficulty, my friends, is not in avoiding death, but in avoiding unrighteousness; for that runs faster than death.” ― Socrates

“It is not difficult to avoid death, gentlemen of the jury; it is much more difficult to avoid wickedness, for it runs faster than death.” ― Socrates

“For the fear of death is indeed the pretense of wisdom, and not real wisdom, being a pretense of knowing the unknown; and no one know whether death, which men in their fear apprehend to be the greatest evil, may not be the greatest good. Is not this ignorance of a disgraceful sort, the ignorance which is the conceit that a man knows that he does not know? And in this respect only I believe myself to differ from men in general, and may perhaps claim to be wiser than they are: that whereas I know but little of the world below, I do not suppose that I know...” ― Socrates

“God would seem to indicate to us and not allow us to doubt that these beautiful poems are not human, or the work of man, but divine and the work of God; and that the poets are only the interpreters of the Gods...” ― Socrates

“A man who really fights for justice must lead a private, not a public, life if he is to survive for even a short time.” ― Socrates

“I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance.” ― Socrates

“The law presumably says that it is finest to keep as quiet as possible in misfortunes and not be irritated, since the good and bad in such things aren't plain, nor does taking it hard get one anywhere, not are any of the human things worthy of great seriousness.... One must accept the fall of the dice and settle one's affairs accordingly-- in whatever way argument declares would be best. One must not behave like children who have stumbled and who hold on to the hurt place and spend their time in crying out; rather one must always habituate the soul to turn as quickly as possible to curing and setting aright what has fallen and is sick, doing away with lament by medicine.” ― Socrates

“I do nothing but go about persuading you all, old and young alike, not to take thought for your persons or your properties, but and chiefly to care about the greatest improvement of the soul. I tell you that virtue is not given by money, but that from virtue comes money and every other good of man...” ― Socrates

“The secret of change is to focus all of your energy not on fighting the old, but on building the new.” ― Socrates

“How many things can I do without?” ― Socrate

“Wisdom is knowing you know nothing” ― Socrates

“Nobody is qualified to become a statesman who is entirely ignorant of the problem of wheat.” ― Socrates

“Do you feel no compunction, Socrates, at having followed a line of action which puts you in danger of the death penalty?' I might fairly reply to him, 'You are mistaken, my friend, if you think that a man who is worth anything ought to spend his time weighing up the prospects of life and death. He has only one thing to consider in performing any action--that is, whether he is acting rightly or wrongly, like a good man or a bad one.” ― Socrates

“Employ your time in improving yourself by other men's writings, so that you shall gain easily what others have labored hard for.” ― Socrates

“And a thing is not seen because it is visible, but conversely, visible because it is seen; nor is a thing led because it is in the state of being led, or carried because it is in the state of being carried, but the converse of this. And now I think, Euthyphro, that my meaning will be intelligible; and my meaning is, that any state of action or passion implies previous action or passion. It does not become because it is becoming, but it is in a state of becoming because it becomes; neither does it suffer because it is in a state of suffering, but it is in a state of suffering because it suffers. Do you not agree?” ― Socrates

“One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“By far the greatest and most admirable form of wisdom is that needed to plan and beautify cities and human communities.” ― Socrates

“And the same things look bent and straight when seen in water and out of it, and also both concave and convex, due to the sight’s being mislead by the colors, and every sort of confusion of this kind is plainly in our soul. And, then, it is because they take advantage of this affection in our nature that shadow painting, and puppeteering, and many other tricks of the kind fall nothing short of wizardry.” ― Socrates

“Worthless people live only to eat and drink; people of worth eat and drink only to live.” ― Socrates

“To fear death, gentlemen, is no other than to think oneself wise when one is not, to think one knows what one does not know. No one knows whether death may not be the greatest of all blessings for a man, yet men fear it as if they knew that it is the greatest of evils. And surely it is the most blameworthy ignorance to believe that one knows what one does not know. It is perhaps on this point and in this respect, gentlemen, that I differ from the majority of men, and if I were to claim that I am wiser than anyone in anything, it would be in this, that, as I have no adequate knowledge of things in the underworld, so I do not think I have. I do know, however, that it is wicked and shameful to do wrong, to disobey one's superior, be he god or man. I shall never fear or avoid things of which I do not know, whether they may not be good rather than things that I know to be bad.” ― Socrates

“wealth does not bring goodness, but goodness brings wealth and every other blessing, both to the individual and to the state” ― socrates

“How can you wonder your travels do you no good, when you carry yourself around with you?” ― Socrates

“The Only Thing I Know For Sure Is That I Know Nothing At All, For Sure” ― Socrate

“Programming is not about what you know. It's about what you can figure out.” ― Socrates

“I don't know why I did it, I don't know why I enjoyed it, and I don't know why I'll do it again.” ― Socrates

“Nosce te ipsum” ― Socrates

“Everything is plainer when spoken than when unspoken.” ― Socrates

“...each individual can only do one thing well. He can't do lots of things. If he tries, he will be jack of all trades, and master of none.” ― Socrates

“The really important thing is not live, but to live well.” ― Socrates

“The answer I gave myself and the oracle was that it was to my advantage to be as I am.” ― Socrates

“To fear death, gentlemen, is no other then to think oneself wise when one is not, to think one knows what one does not know.” ― Socrates

“Athenian men, I respect and love you, but I shall obey the god rather than you...” ― Socrates

“For this fear of death is indeed the pretense of wisdom, and not real wisdom, being the appearance of knowing the unknown; since no one knows whether death, which they in their fear apprehend to be the greatest evil, may not be the greatest good. Is there not here conceit of knowledge, which is a disgraceful sort of ignorance? And this is the point in which, as I think, I am superior to men in general, and in which I might perhaps fancy myself wiser than other men, - that whereas I know but little of the world below, I do not suppose that I know: but I do know that injustice and disobedience to a better, whether God or man, is evil and dishonorable, and I will never fear or avoid a possible good rather than a certain evil.” ― Socrates

“What I do not know, I do not think I know.” ― Socrates

“I thought that as I had failed in the contemplation of true existence, I ought to be careful that I did not lose the eye of my soul; as people may injure their bodily eye by observing and gazing on the sun during an eclipse, unless they take the precaution of looking at the image reflected in the water, or in some similar medium. ...I was afraid that my soul might be blinded altogether if I looked at things with my eyes or tried by the help of my senses to apprehend them. And I thought that I had better had recourse to ideas, and seek in them truth in existence. I dare to say that the simile is not perfect--for I am far from admitting that he who contemplates existence through the medium of ideas, sees them only "through a glass darkly," any more than he who sees them in their working and effects.” ― Socrates

“True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, & the world around us.” ― Socrates

“the great honor in the world is to be what we pretend to be” ― Socrates

“Having the fewest wants, I am nearest to the gods.” ― Socrates

“The hour of departure has arrived, and we go our ways - I to die, and you to live. Which is better only god knows.” ― Socrates

“Is there anyone to whom you entrust a greater number of serious matters than your wife? And is there anyone with whom you have fewer conversations?” ― Socrates

“As for me, all I know is that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“I pity those reviewers above, and people like them, who ridicule authors like R.A. Boulay and other proponents of similar Ancient Astronaut theories, simply for putting forth so many interesting questions (because that's really what he often throughout openly admits is all he does does) in light of fascinating and thought-provoking references which are all from copious sources. Some people will perhaps only read the cover and introduction and dismiss it as soon as any little bit of information flies in the face of their beliefs or normalcy biases. Some of those people, I'm sure, are some of the ones who reviewed this book so negatively without any constructive criticism or plausible rebuttal. It's sad to see how programmed and indoctrinated the vast majority of humanity has become to the ills of dogma, indoctrination, unverified status quos and basic ignorance; not to mention the laziness and conformity that results in such acquiescence and lack of critical thinking or lack of information gathering to confirm or debunk something. Too many people just take what's spoon fed to them all their lives and settle for it unquestioningly. For those people I like to offer a great Einstein quote and one of my personal favorites and that is: "Condemnation without investigation is the highest form of ignorance" I found this book to be a very interesting gathering of information and collection of obscure and/or remote antiquated information, i.e. biblical, sacred, mythological and otherwise, that we were not exactly taught to us in bible school, or any other public school for that matter. And I am of the school of thought that has been so for intended purposes. The author clearly cites all his fascinating sources and cross-references them rather plausibly. He organizes the information in a sequential manner that piques ones interest even as he jumps from one set of information to the next. The information, although eclectic as it spans from different cultures and time periods, interestingly ties together in several respects and it is this synchronicity that makes the information all the more remarkable. For those of you who continue to seek truth and enlightenment because you understand that an open mind makes for and lifelong pursuit of such things I leave you with these Socrates quotes: "True wisdom comes to each of us when we realize how little we understand about life, ourselves, and the world around us.” ― Socrates

“It is only in death that we are truly cured of the 'sickness' of life.” ― Socrates

“Conocerse a uno mismo, ese es el principio fundamental de la verdadera sabiduría Humana.” ― Socrates

“We approach truth only inasmuch as we depart from life. For what do we, who love truth, strive after in life? To free ourselves from the body, and from all the evil that is caused by the life of the body! If so, then how can we fail to be glad when death comes to us? The wise man seeks death all his life and therefore death is not terrible to him.” ― Socrates

“القناعة هي المصدر الحقيقي لأكبر لذة” ― Socrates

“One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing” ― Socrates

“The way to gain a good reputation, is to endeavor to be what you desire to appear.” ― Socrates

“A Life without criticism and status is not a worth living.” ― Socrates

“I shall never cease from the practice and teaching of philosophy, exhorting anyone whom I meet after my manner, and convincing him, saying: O my friend, why do you who are a citizen of the great and mighty and wise city of Athens, care so much about laying up the greatest amount of money and honor and reputation, and so little about wisdom and truth and the greatest improvement of the soul, which you never regard or heed at all? Are you not ashamed of this?” ― Socrates

“And in knowing that you know nothing makes you the smartest of all.” ― Socrates

“Would that the majority could inflict the greatest evils, for they would then be capable of the greatest good, and that would be fine, but now they cannot do either. They cannot make a man either wise or foolish, but they inflict things haphazardly.” ― Socrates

“Well, then, let’s not just trust the likelihood based on painting.” ― Socrates

“You are wrong sir, if you think that a man who is any good at all should take into account the risk of life or death; he should look to this only in his actions, whether what he does is right or wrong.” ― Socrates

“Thou should eat to live; not live to eat.” ― Socrates

“I know I'm intelligent because I know that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“Life without enquiry is not worth living.” ― Socrates

“I know that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“The greatest way to live with honor in this world is to be what we pretend to be.” ― Socrates

“I cannot teach anybody anything I can only make them think” ― Socrates

“Scio me nihil scire" - I know that I know nothing” ― Sokrates

“I am the wisest man alive, for I know one thing, and that is that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“I was attached to this city by the god—though it seems a ridiculous thing to say—as upon a great and noble horse which was somewhat sluggish because of its size and needed to be stirred up by a kind of gadfly. It is to fulfill some such function that I believe the god has placed me in the city. I never cease to rouse each and every one of you, to persuade and reproach you all day long and everywhere I find myself in your company.” ― Socrates

“Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty".” ― Socrates

“To know, is to know that you know nothing. That is the meaning of true knowledge.” ― Socrates

“There is one way, then, in which a man can be free from all anxiety about the fate of his soul - if in life he has abandoned bodily pleasures and adornments, as foreign to his purpose and likely to do more harm than good, and has devoted himself to the pleasures of acquiring knowledge, and so by decking his soul not with a borrowed beauty but with its own - with self-control, and goodness, and courage, and liberality, and truth - has fitted himself to await his journey in the next world.” ― Socrates

“Man's greatest privilege is the discussion of virtue" Socrates in The Apology.” ― Socrates

“By means of beauty, all beautiful things become beautiful.” ― Socrates

“wisdom begins in wonder” ― Socrates

“I will not yield to any man contrary to what is right, for fear of death, even if I should die at once for not yielding.” ― Socrates

“Do you know that the spectator is the last of the rings which, as I am saying, receive the power of the original magnet from one another? The rhapsode like yourself and the actor are intermediate links, and the poet himself is the first of them. Through all these the God sways the souls of men in any direction which he pleases, and makes one man hang down from another. Thus there is a vast chain of dancers and masters and undermasters of choruses, who are suspended, as if from the stone, at the side of the rings which hang down from the Muse. And every poet has some Muse from whom he is suspended, and by whom he is said to be possessed, which is nearly the Ion 5 same thing; for he is taken hold of. ” ― Socrates

“I neither know nor think that I know” ― Socrates

“...[T]he really important thing is not to live, but to live well... [a]nd to live well means the same thing as to live honourably or rightly...” ― Socrates

“Wen das Wort nicht schlägt, den schlägt auch der Stock nicht.” ― Socrates

“Beloved Pan and all ye other gods who haunt this place, give me beauty in the inward soul, and may the outward and the inner man be at one.” ― Socrates

“...a good man cannot be harmed either in life or in death, and that his affairs are not neglected by the gods.” ― Socrates

“I am wiser than this man, for neither of us appears to know anything great and good; but he fancies he knows something, although he knows nothing; whereas I, as I do not know anything, so I do not fancy I do. In this trifling particular, then, I appear to be wiser than he, because I do not fancy I know what I do not know.” ― Socrates

“Get not your friends by bare compliments, but by giving them sensible tokens of your love.” ― Socrates

“Is there not one true coin for which all things ought to exchange?- and that is wisdom; and only in exchange for this, and in company with this, is anything truly bought or sold, whether courage, temperance or justice. And is not all true virtue the companion of wisdom, no matter what fears or pleasures or other similar goods or evils may or may not attend her? But the virtue which is made up of these goods, when they are severed from wisdom and exchanged with one another, is a shadow of virtue only, nor is there any freedom or health or truth in her; but in the true exchange there is a purging away of all these things, and temperance, and justice, and courage, and wisdom herself, are a purgation of them.” ― Socrates

“...[S]ome of the opinions which people entertain should be respected, and others should not.” ― Socrates

“It is a base thing for a man to wax old in careless self-neglect before he has lifted up his eyes and seen what manner of man he was made to be, in the full perfection of bodily strength and beauty. But these glories are withheld from him who is guilty of self-neglect, for they are not wont to blaze forth unbidden.” ― Socrates

“The definition of terms is the beginning of wisdom.” ― Socrates

“Der Missbrauch der Sprache lässt Böses in die Seele” ― Sokrates

“The poets are only the interpreters of the Gods.” ― Socrates

“Suppose... that you acquit me... Suppose that, in view of this, you said to me 'Socrates, on this occasion we shall disregard Anytus and acquit you, but only on one condition, that you give up spending your time on this quest and stop philosophizing. If we catch you going on in the same way, you shall be put to death.' Well, supposing, as I said, that you should offer to acquit me on these terms, I should reply 'Gentlemen, I am your very grateful and devoted servant, but I owe a greater obedience to God than to you; and so long as I draw breath and have my faculties, I shall never stop practicing philosophy and exhorting you and elucidating the truth for everyone that I meet. I shall go on saying, in my usual way, "My very good friend, you are an Athenian and belong to a city which is the greatest and most famous in the world for its wisdom and strength. Are you not ashamed that you give your attention to acquiring as much money as possible, and similarly with reputation and honour, and give no attention or thought to truth and understanding and the perfection of your soul?" And if any of you disputes this and professes to care about these things, I shall not at once let him go or leave him; no, I shall question him and examine him and test him; and if it appears that in spite of his profession he has made no real progress towards goodness, I shall reprove him for neglecting what is of supreme importance, and giving his attention to trivialities. I shall do this to everyone that I meet, young or old, foreigner or fellow-citizen; but especially to you my fellow-citizens, inasmuch as you are closer to me in kinship. This, I do assure you, is what my God commands; and it is my belief that no greater good has ever befallen you in this city than my service to my God; for I spend all my time going about trying to persuade you, young and old, to make your first and chief concern not for your bodies nor for your possessions, but for the highest welfare of your souls, proclaiming as I go 'Wealth does not bring goodness, but goodness brings wealth and every other blessing, both to the individual and to the State.' ...And so, gentlemen, I would say, 'You can please yourselves whether you listen to Anytus or not, and whether you acquit me or not; you know that I am not going to alter my conduct, not even if I have to die a hundred deaths.” ― Socrates

“Knowledge will make you be free.” ― Socrates

“Aren't you ashamed to be concerned so much about making all the money you can and advancing your reputation and prestige, while for truth and wisdom and the improvement of your souls you have no thought or car?” ― Socrates

“By all means, marry. If you get a good wife, you’ll become happy; if you get a bad one, you’ll become a philosopher.” ― Socrates

“By all means marry. If you get a good spouse you'll become happy, while if you get a bad one you'll become a philosopher.” ― Socrates

“...[W]hy should we pay so much attention to what 'most people' think? The really reasonable people, who have more claim to be considered, will believe that the facts are exactly as they are.” ― Socrates

“He who would change the world should first change himself.” ― Socrates

“Before you speak, think if what you intend to say catches in one of the three sieves: 1. The sieve of truth 2. The sieve of love 3. The sieve of necessity” ― Sokrates

“I drank what?” ― Socrates

“The mind is the pilot of the soul.” ― Socrates

“..Do we have not choice but to agree that in each of us are found the same elements and characteristics as are found in the city? After all, where else could the city have got them from?” ― Socrates

“Thus such another will not easily come to you, men, but if you believe me, you will spare me; but perhaps you might possibly be offended, like the sleeping who are awakened, striking me, believing Anytus, you might easily kill, then the rest of your lives you might continue sleeping, unless the god caring for you should send you another.” ― Socrates

“He who knows not and knows not that he knows not is an incorrigible fool.” ― Socrates

“Could I climb the highest place in Athens, I would lift up my voice and proclaim, "Fellow citizens, why do you burn and scrape every stone to gather wealth, and talk so little care of your children to whom you must one day relinquish all?” ― Socrates

“Semper Ubi Sub Ubi” ― Socrates

“Hayat kısa, vazife ağır, fırsatlar geçicidir.” ― Socrates

“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing...” ― Socrates

“Kehidupan yang tak dipikirkan adalah kehidupan yang tak pantas untuk dijalani” ― Socrates

“Madness, provided it comes as the gift of heaven, is the channel by which we receive the greatest blessings....the men of old who gave things their names saw no disgrace or reproach in madness; otherwise they would not have connected it with the name of the noblest of all arts, the art of discerning the future, and called it the manic art....So, according to the evidence provided by our ancestors, madness is a nobler thing than sober sense...madness comes from God, whereas sober sense is merely human.” ― Socrates

“So I withdrew and thought to myself: 'I am wiser than this man; it is likely that neither of us knows anything worthwhile, but he thinks he knows something when he does not, whereas when I do not know, neither do I think I know; so I am likely to be wiser than he to this small extent, that I do not think I know what I do not know.” ― Socrates

“I only wish that ordinary people had an unlimited capacity for doing harm; then they might have an unlimited power for doing good.” ― Socrates

“I am likely to be wiser than he to this small, extent, that I do not think I know what I do not know.” ― Socrates

“Human nature will not easily find a better helper than eros” ― Socrates

“I only know one thing, and that is I know nothing” ― Socrates

“...[F]rom me you shall hear the whole truth; not, I can assure you, gentlemen, in flowery language... decked out with fine words and phrases; no, what you will hear will be a straightforward speech in the first words that occur to me, confident as I am in the justice of my cause; and I do not want any of you to expect anything different.” ― Socrates

“It is better to suffer wrong than to do wrong” ― Socrates

“The way to gain a good reputation is to endeavor to be what you desire to appear.” ― Socrates

“Speak, so that I may see you.” ― Socrates

“An honest man is always a child.” ― Socrates

“تكلم حتي أراك” ― Socrates

“I only know, I know nothing” ― Socrates

“...[B]y observing objects with my eyes and trying to comprehend them with each of my other senses I might blind my soul altogether... [like] when [people] watch and study an eclipse of the sun; they really do sometimes injure their eyes, unless they study its reflection in water or some other medium.” ― Socrates

“...[W]hen death comes to a man, the mortal part of him dies, but the immortal part retires at the approach of death and escapes unharmed and indestructible... [I]t is as certain as anything can be... that soul is immortal and imperishable, and that our souls will really exist in the next world.” ― Socrates

“And now we go, you to your lives, and I to death, and which of us goes to the better only God knows” ― Socrates

“For each of them, men, is able, going into each of the cities, to persuade the young-who can associate with whomever of their own citizens they wish to for free-they persuade these young men to leave off their associations with the latter, and to associate with themselves instead, and to give them money and acknowledge gratitude besides.” ― Socrates, Apology

“If the soul is immortal, it demands our care not only for that part of time which we call life, but for all time: and indeed it would seem now that it will be extremely dangerous to neglect it. If death were a release from everything, it would be a boon for the wicked. But since the soul is clearly immortal, it can have no escape or security from evil except by becoming as good and wise as it possibly can. For it takes nothing with it to the next world except its education and training: and these, we are told, are of supreme importance in helping or harming the newly dead at the very beginning of his journey there.” ― Socrates

“I am likely to be wiser than he to this small, extent, that I do not think I know what I do not know” ― Socrates

“Two things greater than all the things are.On is love and the other is war.” ― Socrates

“No man is capable of causing great evil without thinking he's doing the right thing.” ― Socrates

“Let us reflect in another way, and we shall see that there is great reason to hope that death is a good; for one of two things—either death is a state of nothingness and utter unconsciousness, or, as men say, there is a change and migration of the soul from this world to another. Now if you suppose that there is no consciousness, but a sleep like the sleep of him who is undisturbed even by dreams, death will be an unspeakable gain. For if a person were to select the night in which his sleep was undisturbed even by dreams, and were to compare with this the other days and nights of his life, and then were to tell us how many days and nights he had passed in the course of his life better and more pleasantly than this one, I think that any man, I will not say a private man, but even the great king will not find many such days or nights, when compared with the others. Now if death be of such a nature, I say that to die is gain; for eternity is then only a single night. But if death is the journey to another place, and there, as men say, all the dead abide, what good, O my friends and judges, can be greater than this? If indeed when the pilgrim arrives in the world below, he is delivered from the professors of justice in this world, and finds the true judges who are said to give judgment there, Minos and Rhadamanthus and Aeacus and Triptolemus, and other sons of God who were righteous in their own life, that pilgrimage will be worth making. What would not a man give if he might converse with Orpheus and Musaeus and Hesiod and Homer? Nay, if this be true, let me die again and again.” ― Socrates

“A man who preserves his integrity no real, long-lasting harm can ever come.” ― Socrates

“He who is not content with what he has will not be content with what he would like to have.” ― Socrates

“Is something good because the gods approve of it? Or do the gods approve of it because it is good?” ― Socrates

“...{I]f everything that has some share of life were to die, and if after death the dead remained in that form and did not come to life again, would it not be quite inevitable that in the end everything should be dead and nothing alive?... [W]hat possible means could prevent their number from being exhausted by death?” ― Socrates

“I am convinced that I never wrong anyone intentionally...” ― Socrates

“I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.” ― Socrates

“Rhythm and harmony permeate the innermost element of the soul, affect it more powerfully than anything else, and bring it grace, such education makes one graceful if one is properly trained, and the opposite if one is not.” ― Socrates

“The only wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.” ― Socrates

“Sometimes you have to lose your mind before you come to your senses.” ― Socrates

“. . .it is a disgrace to grow old through sheer carelessness before seeing what manner of man you may become by developing your bodily strength and beauty to their highest limit.” ― Socrates

“Now it is time that we are going, I to die and you to live; but which of us has the happier prospect is unknown to anyone but God” ― Socrates

“The only thing i know is that i know nothing.” ― Socrates

“To find the Father of all is hard. And when found, it is impossible to utter Him.” ― Socrates

“One thing that I know, is that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“They give you the semblance of success, I give you the reality...” ― Socrates

“If I save my insight, I don’t attend to weakness of eyesight.” ― Socrates

“The mind is everything; what you think you become!” ― Socrates

“...[W]e must not let it enter our minds that there may be no validity in argument. On the contrary we should recognize that we ourselves are still intellectual invalids; but that we must brace ourselves and do our best to become healthy... No greater misfortune could happen to anyone than that of developing a dislike for argument.” ― Socrates

“When the debate is over, slander becomes the tool of the loser.” ― Socrates

“I would rather die having spoken after my manner, than speak in your manner and live.” ― Socrates

“It seems to me that whatever else is beautiful apart from absolute Beauty is beautiful because it partakes of that absolute Beauty, and for no other reason... [I]t is by Beauty that beautiful things are beautiful.” ― Socrates

“If it were said that without such bones and sinews and all the rest of them I should not be able to do what I think is right, it would be true; but to say that it is because of them that I do what I am doing, and not through choice of what is best - although my actions are controlled by Mind - would be a very lax and inaccurate form of expression.” ― Socrates

“Do we say that one must never willingly do wrong, or does it depend upon the circumstances? Is it true, as we have often agreed before, that there is no sense in which wrongdoing is good or honourable? Or have we jettisoned all our former convictions in these last few days? Can you and I at our age, Crito, have spent all these years in serious discussions without realizing that we were no better than a pair of children? Surely the truth is just what we have always said. Whatever the popular view is, and whether the alternative in pleasanter than the present one or even harder to bear, the fact remains that to do wrong is in every sense bad and dishonourable for the person who does it.” ― Socrates

“All I know is that I know nothing” ― Socrates

“Do you imagine that a city can continue to exist and not be turned upside down, if the legal judgments which are pronounced in it have no force but are nullified and destroyed by private persons?” ― Socrates

“Homme, connais-toi toi-même!” ― Socrates

“Εν οίδα ότι ουδέν οίδα” ― Socrates

“...[R]eal wisdom is the property of God, and... human wisdom has little or no value.” ― Socrates

“If the soul is immortal, it demands our care not only for that part of time which we call life, but for all time; and indeed it would seem now that it will be extremely dangerous to neglect it. If death were a release from everything, it would be a boon for the wicked, because by dying they would be released not only from the body but also from their own wickedness together with the soul; but as it is, since the soul is clearly immortal, it can have no escape of security from evil except by becoming as good and wise as it possibly can. For it takes nothing with it to the next world except its education and training...” ― Socrates

“Once a man knows good from evil, nothing on earth can compel him to act against that knowledge.” ― Socrates

“Craindre la mort, Athéniens, ce n'est autre chose que se croire sage sans l'être, car c'est croire connaître ce que l'on ne connaît point.” ― Socrates

“...[Y]ou know very well the truth of what I [say]... I have incurred a great deal of bitter hostility; and this is what will bring about my destruction, if anything does... the slander and jealousy of a very large section of the people. They have been fatal to a great many other innocent men, and I suppose will continue to be so; there is no likelihood that they will stop at me. But perhaps someone will say 'Do you feel no compunction, Socrates, at having followed a line of action which puts you in danger of the death-penalty?' I might fairly reply to him 'You are mistaken, my friend, if you think that a man who is worth anything ought to spend his time weighing up the prospects of life and death. He has only one thing to consider in performing any action; that is, whether he is acting rightly or wrongly, like a good man or a bad one...['] The truth of the matter is this, gentlemen. Where a man has once taken up his stand, either because it seems best to him or in obedience to his orders, there I believe he is bound to remain and face the danger, taking no account of death or anything else before dishonour.” ― Socrates

“Loin de parler quand on me paie, et de me taire quand on me donne rien.” ― Socrates

“الرفاهية و الأبهة تلك هي السعادة في نظرك . أما أنا فإني أعتقد أنه إذا كان من خصائص الإله أنه لا يحتاج إلى شيء، فإن مما يقرب من الألوهية أن لا يحتاج الإنسان إلا إلى قليل . و بما أنه لا أكمل من الله فإن القرب منه قرب من الكمال” ― Socrates

“ម្ដាយខ្ញុំជាឆ្មបសម្រាលកូន ​ឯខ្ញុំជាឆ្មបសម្រាយគំនិត។” ― Socrates

“But my dear Crito, why should we care so much about what the majority think?” ― Socrates

“I know one thing, that I know nothing.” ― Socrates

“You are mistaken, my friend, if you think that a man who is worth anything ought to spend his time weighing up the prospects of life and death. He has only one thing to consider in performing any action; that is, whether he is acting justly or unjustly, like a good man or a bad one.” ― Socrates

“Justice. If only we knew what it was.” ― Socrates

“When I leave this court I shall go away condemned by you to death, but they will go away convicted by Truth herself of depravity and wickedness. And they accept their sentence even as I accept mine...I tell you, my executioners, that as soon as I am dead, vengeance shall fall upon you with a punishment far more painful than your killing of me. You have brought about my death in the belief that through it you will be delivered from submitting your conduct to criticism; but I say that the result will be just the opposite. You will have more critics... If you expect to stop denunciation of your wrong way of life by putting people to death, there is something amiss with your reasoning.This way of escape is neither possible nor creditable; the best and easiest way is not to stop the mouths of others, but to make yourselves as good men as you can. This is my last message to you who voted for my condemnation.” ― Socrates

“Dar să adâncim puţin judecata ce e întemeiată pe nădejdea de a socoti moartea un bine. în adevăr, din două lucruri unul este a fi mort: sau este tot una cu a nu fi deloc, şi atunci cel mort n-are nici o simţire pentru nimic, sau este, după cum spun unii, numai o schimbare şi o trecere a sufletului dintr-un loc într-altul. Şi dacă în moarte nu-i nici o simţire, ci este aşa ca un somn adânc, când cineva doarme fără măcar să aibă un vis, atunci moartea se înfăţişează ca un minunat câştig. Căci eu socotesc că dacă şi-ar alege cineva o noapte în care a dormit aşa de bine că n-a fost tulburat nici măcar de un vis, dacă apoi ar compara acea noapte cu toate celelalte nopţi şi zile ale vieţii sale şi, cercetându-le întru sine, ar trebui să spună câte zile şi câte nopţi din viaţa lui a trăit mai liniştit şi mai plăcut decât în noaptea aceea, socotesc că nu numai un om de rând, dar însuşi Marele Rege ar găsi că acestea sunt prea puţine la număr faţă de celelalte zile şi nopţi. Dacă moartea este aşa ceva, eu o numesc câştig. Căci atunci întreaga veşnicie nu pare a fi altceva decât o singură noapte senină. Dacă însă moartea este ca şi o călătorie de aici în alt loc, dacă sunt adevărate cele ce se spun, că acela este locul de întâlnire al tuturor care au murit, atunci ce bine s-ar putea închipui mai mare decât moartea, o, judecătorii mei?” ― Socrates

“Este hombre, por una parte, cree que sabe algo, mientras que no sabe [nada]. Por otra parte, yo, que igualmente no sé [nada], tampoco creo [saber algo].” ― Socrates

“Virtue is not given by money, but that from virtue comes money and every other good of man, public as well as private.” ― Socrates